News reel

2021

¯ May: My newest paper on predicitve heliophysics was accepted by Advances in Space Research. It is still in editorial preparation, but look out for it here. More details will follow.

¯ May: My second pro article as a science journalist is in print now in Sky & Telescope. It is about the first solid observations that astronomers have of exocomets, little roamers in other stellar systems.

¯ February: I've started working in a full-time job as tech coordinator for the participation of a large greek IT firm to EE-funded research projects. Which is a nice way of transferring skills such as sitting at meetings and writing documentation. : ]


2020

¯ December: For some time now I've been preparing to work as a science journalist. My first pro article is now out in - very surprisingly - Scientific American. I've also written a few other pieces either voluntarily or as part of training, which you can find in the portfolio.

¯ July: An update of my forecast for solar cycle 25, which is now just starting, is posted on arXiv. The first flare of the new cycle appeared in late May, which was compatible with the first version of the forecast, but it also permits more accurate predictions.
Here is a second article for ParticleBites where I now contribute regularly. "Crystals are dark matter's best friends" about growing crystals in the lab and using them to catch dark matter.

¯ June: An update on the possible relation between solar flares and the motion of the planets and on taking advantage of it for forecasting solar activity, "Planetary statistics and forecasting for solar flares". Written by former-and-now-current-again colleague and me.
Two articles in English-speaking media. "Physicists measured general relativity’s effects using clocks", or how time passes more quickly on the top floor of Tokyo Skytree, for Massive Science. And "Listening for axions", or how dark matter is still not found but doing so in increasingly refined ways, for ParticleBites.

¯ No milestone events lately. I am in a place between data analysis, solar physics and science journalism, curious to see towards which direction the symmetry will break :p


2019

¯ December: The Ph-word newsletter turned into a blog.

¯ October: I wrote "The unbearable success of the Standard Model", a feature article for Prisma, one of the three greek science publications. It is about the status of the most successful yet greatly incomplete theory humans ever had and, yes, it is particle physics.

¯ July: Astro-tourism! I spoke about dark matter at the Asea Observatory in Arkadia region, probably the only community-run observatory in Greece, followed by sky viewing. (The village's street lights were even turned off for the occasion!)

¯ My forecast for the next solar cycle was posted on arXiv, the pre-print server for all things physics.


2018

¯ In November a poster by me appeared at the European Space Weather Week, in Leuven, Belgium. Subject: "Planetary triggering and statistical forecasting of extreme events.

¯ In mid-October I had the joy of speaking at the opening event of the NASA Space Apps Challenge in Larisa, here in Greece. I told the enthusiastic participants a few things about the star closest to us (yeap, that's the Sun).

¯ August: I visited Leiden in the Netherlands for the quite interesting Astro Hack Week workshop. Also, my article gets online (in the correct issue of the journal, this time :)

¯ In July I was knocked off my socks by writing a guest post about my solar research in the Quantum Diaries Survivor blog.

¯ April: My astrophysics article is accepted for publication; also, I begin a monthly pop-physics newsletter, "The Ph-Word".


2017

¯ December'17: After three months spent in southern London suburbs the "household" got back in Athens, the fifth move in 2017.

¯ In September v.2 of my astrophysics work got on arxiv.

¯ The beginning of August saw the move from Tokyo to Athens. After two and a half years spent in the far east it was not easy!

¯ July was (publicly) eventful: A talk at APRIM'17, the regional meeting of the International Astronomical Union in Taipei; a seminar at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; a presentation at the exciting pop science event "Nerd Nite" in Tokyo. ( That speakers' free drink was my first earning while freelance~ )

¯ In March I became a wandering physicist by leaving Daejeon in S.Korea for Taipei. In June I moved over to Tokyo.